GEORGE CORDES
bass-baritone
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George Cordes © All rights reserved

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Biography.
Reviews.
Repertoire.
Media.
Contact.

Critical Acclaim

Sweeney Todd (Sweeney Todd)
Pendragon Theatre (2011)

“The powerful production will leave you with chills ... George Cordes, in the title roll, is impressive, never missing a note (and with) the voice of a booming bass ...”  
Adirondack Daily Enterprise

 

Sarastro (The Magic Flute)

"George Cordes was a standout presence and power as Sarastro."
Binghamton Press & Sun-Bulletin

Figaro (The Marriage of Figaro)

"plush-toned"    Opera News

"George Cordes portrayed a Figaro who seemed to grow to maturity over the course of the work, a touch not usually considered."
New York Times

"... an outstanding Figaro. Blessed with a fine bass-baritone voice and good stage presence, he brought the valet to vivid life ..."
St. Louis Post-Dispatch

"Bass-baritone George Cordes fully inhabited the title role ..."
Chicago Tribune

"... a convincing Figaro with a strong, flexible voice, cleverly and with humor dispatching events towards a happy ending ..."
Opera Canada

"George Cordes as Figaro impresses as yet another captivating American baritone - handsome, relaxed on stage, mellow of voice."
Columbus Dispatch

"The emotionally involved Figaro of George Cordes stood out in a first-rate cast ..."    Opera Canada

"a sturdy Figaro in stature, appearance and voice"
Columbus Alive

"It was Cordes ... who provided much of (the) fun ... Blessed with a grin as big as his voice, all this guy has to do is smile and the audience smiles with him; that he happens to be a fine singer and actor is icing on the cake."   
Akron Beacon Journal

Nourabad (The Pearlfishers)

"... we can't forget the resonant bass voice of George Cordes. Mr. Cordes' portrayal ... was right on the mark and, coupled with the considerable vocal ability he displayed, added just the right amount of compassion and menace to whatever scene he was in."  OperaOnline.us

Colline (La Boheme)

"... a warm, rich voice which ... has presence ... He is a confident stage actor who brought the requisite gravity to (Colline) without turning him pompous ..."   New York Times

"George Cordes handled eloquently the aria in which he sings his farewell to the coat he is to pawn."
New York Daily News

Leporello (Don Giovanni)

"The premier acting came from George Cordes as the title character's loyal, yet realistic, servant, Leporello. He made the most of the scene-stealing comedy."
Syracuse Post-Standard

"The Leporello of George Cordes was especially fine in the catalog aria, and Cordes' mimicry of his master's serenading of Elvira was very funny without being hammy."
Ithaca Journal

The Rev. Hale (The Crucible)

"Bass George Cordes ... sang with authority and command of the music, more than holding up his end in an all-around superior cast."
Bay Windows online

"George Cordes (was an) effective ... villain, all sneer, until (he) rounded his characterization when Hale sees through the treachery."
The Boston Phoenix

Bottom (Midsummer Night's Dream)

"In the role of the buffoon, Bottom, bass-baritone George Cordes stood out. His handsome, powerful voice was even throughout its range and was exemplary in enunciation."
Belgian Operaguide

"George Cordes' more textured tone and pushier manner were perfect for Bottom."     Opera News

"George Cordes animates the comic role of Bottom."     University News

Timur (Turandot)

"Timur's lament at the death of Liù was deeply touching in George Cordes' performance."    Opera News

Monterone (Rigoletto)

"Good acting was at a premium. George Cordes' dignified Monterone exemplified a singer whose vocal and dramatic abilities were fully in sync."
New York Times

"Cordes's delivery of Monterone's curse (is) lyrically haunting."
Houston Press

Escamillo (Carmen)

"As the strutting matador, George Cordes charmed the audience with a winning smile, an easy chuckle and a cannon of a voice."
Grand Rapids Press

Scarpia (Tosca)

"As for George Cordes's Scarpia, the New York City Opera baritone projected a suave cruelty in the very sound of his voice."    Toronto Star

"... the evil Scarpia, to whom George Cordes did nasty justice ...  Cordes has a firm, beautifully balanced bass voice, and his crisp Italian added immensely."    Akron Beacon Journal

 

“Of special mention is George Cordes, who played the part of Sweeney Todd, turning in a powerful and witty performance, with a voice that rocked the house.”   The Free George online magazine